Time Management with the Time Timer

If you’re always wondering where your day went and feel like you’ve not achieved much, you may wish to give the Pomodoro Technique a go.

The Pomodoro Technique is a time management tool which helps you to focus your time so that you complete projects effectively. Image Source

For every project that you do during the day, you budget your time into 25 minute slots followed by a 5 minute break. Each 25 minute slot is called a “Pomodoro”, which is Italian for tomato.

Once you’ve done 4 Pomodoro’s (100 minutes of project time + 15 minutes worth of breaks, you then take a 15-20 minute break before you continue to work on your project or move onto another project.

Here’s how the technique would work in practice.  Firstly get yourself a pen, paper and timer and then:

  1. Set your timer for 25 minutes and work on a project. Put an “X” on the piece of paper.
  2. Allow yourself a 5 minute break.
  3. Set your timer again for 25 minutes and work on a project.Put an “X” on the piece of paper.
  4. Allow yourself a 5 minute break.
  5. Set your timer again for 25 minutes and work on a project.Put an “X” on the piece of paper.
  6. Allow yourself a 5 minute break.
  7. Set your timer again for 25 minutes and work on a project.Put an “X” on the piece of paper.
  8. Allow yourself a 15-20 minute break

You can use any timer you want or you can buy a special timer from the official Pomodoro Technique website.

I’d love to know what time management technique you use to manage your time effectively.  Simply leave a comment below.

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Comments

  1. Heather Waring says:

    I’ve heard about this before but this is really useful the way you have not just given the name but talked about it and demonstrated how it may work. Think I may give it a try. I do work along these lines using a timer and breaking things into 30 or 60 minute chunks but I don’t always stick to it. Not surprisingly when I do, I’m very productive, when I don’t, I’m not!!

    • I’ve tried it in the past and like you, I’m very productive when I do it. I’m currently using it to help me write blogs which works really well. I like the fact that after 25 minutes, I have to take a break from the PC.

  2. hehehe, I like that it’s called “tomato” 🙂 like Heather, I might give this a try! might, because it sounds like a lot of discipline & I’m a little intimidated =/

    • Sonya, it’s definately worth trying. It took me a while to get my head around the timings and breaks. I would recommend that you set your timer for 25 minutes and have a 5 minute break & see how you get on. Sometimes, that’s enough for the task in hand such a blog post.

  3. Cascata Nerina says:

    I use a “20-20-20” system. I do 20 minutes of something mentally productive – writing or reading for example. Then I do 20 minutes of something physically productive – cleaning or exercise are usually what I do. Finally I do 20 minutes of something that I want to do, often times it may contribute to something else. (Like I may end up doing an extra 20 minutes of writing but for my blog rather than a story, or exercising after cleaning up.) But it may be 20 minutes spent reading a book or talking to a friend as well.

    Though it looks like an hour it usually takes about an hour and five minutes, because I have to switch gears and set my timers. It works for me.

    • Ooh, I like the sound of the 20-20-20 system. I might use it for when I have to do something but don’t want to do it as a good motivator. Thanks for sharing Cascata 🙂

  4. Maximiliano says:

    Loved the article! I would like to recommend an iPhone app to work with the Pomodoro Technique (Disclaimer: I’m one of the developers). It’s super flexible and has the nicest design out there. You can find it here: http://bit.ly/1ePOUHH Hope you like it!

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